Carrie-Ann (as made famous by The Hollies)

“Carrie Anne” is a song written by Allan Clarke, Graham Nash, and Tony Hicks and released by British pop rock group The Hollies. The song was recorded on 1 May 1967 and was released as a single in the same month by Parlophone Records in the United Kingdom and Epic Records in the United States. It became a hit in 1967, reaching #3 on the UK Singles Chart. It was also a hit in the US and Canada, peaking at #9 on both pop charts. It also reached No. 4 in the Irish charts.

Actress Carrie-Anne Moss was named (by her mother) in honor of the song, which was released three months before her birth.

According to Allan Clarke the song was written during a concert the group did with Tom Jones and the song was written mainly by Graham Nash and Tony Hicks with Allan Clarke supplying the lyrics for the middle eight.[1] In 1995, Graham Nash revealed that he had written the song for Marianne Faithfull but was “too shy” to use her real name.[3] The song features steel drums. The song was recorded in only two takes on 1 May 1967 at EMI’s Abbey Road Studios. The first take was a false start and can be heard on the compilation The Hollies at Abbey Road: 1966 to 1970.

Long Cool Woman In A Black Dress (as made famous by The Hollies)

“Long Cool Woman in a Black Dress” (also called “Long Cool Woman” or “Long Cool Woman (in a Black Dress)”) is a song written by Allan Clarke, Roger Cook, and Roger Greenaway and performed by the British rock group The Hollies. Originally appearing on the album Distant Light, it was released as a single in April 1972 (on Parlophone in the United Kingdom),[1] selling 1.5 million copies in the United States and two million worldwide.[3] It reached No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 in September 1972. Billboard ranked it as the No. 24 song for 1972.

On the day “Long Cool Woman” was recorded at AIR Studios, the group’s producer, Ron Richards, was ill and, as a result, the song was produced by the group. The song is different from most Hollies songs in that there are no three-part vocal harmonies, and the song features lead guitar and lead vocal work by Allan Clarke. Upon his return, Ron Richards mixed the recording.[2]

The song was written in the swamp rock[4][5] style of Creedence Clearwater Revival, in terms of the vocal, rhythm, and melodic style. It came out in the spring of 1972 (the same year Creedence split up). Clarke imitated John Fogerty’s vocal style, which was based on the Creedence song “Green River”. According to Clarke, the song was written “in about five minutes”. When the song made its mark in America, Clarke had already left the band, but Clarke feels that “it wasn’t unfortunate”, since he had co-written the song.[2] Clarke rejoined the Hollies in the summer of 1973, partly due to the success of this song.

Allan Clarke – vocals, lead guitar
Tony Hicks and Terry Sylvester – guitar
Bernie Calvert – bass
Bobby Elliott – drums

Phantom, Rocker & Slick released their version on their 1986 album Cover Girl.[16]
Country music singer Clint Black released his version of the song to country radio on 19 February 2008, under the title “Long Cool Woman”. Black’s version charted on the Hot Country Songs chart at #58.[17]
Another country music singer, T. G. Sheppard, covered the song on his 1997 album Nothin’ on But the Radio.[18]
Heavy metal rocker Vince Neil released a heavier version of “Long Cool Woman”, along with other covers and original material, on his third studio album, Tattoos & Tequila, on 22 June 2010.[19]
A cappella group Rockapella released a version on their 1995 album Primer.[20]
The energy corporation BP used it in radio and TV commercials in 2013.
“Long Cool Woman in a Black Dress” was the first song played by the band Phish. They also played the song at their 15th and 20th anniversary concerts.[21]
“Long Cool Woman in a Black Dress” was played by Widespread Panic on 29 October 2000, during the last of three shows on their Halloween Weekend in New Orleans.
The song was used in the 2000 film Remember the Titans.[22] It also appeared in the films Amores Perros,[23] The Longest Yard,[24] The Lovely Bones,[25] Trouble with the Curve,[26] and Kong: Skull Island.[27]

Bus Stop (as made famous by The Hollies)

“Bus Stop” was written by UK songwriter and future 10cc member Graham Gouldman, who also penned major hits for The Yardbirds (“For Your Love”) and Herman’s Hermits (“No Milk Today”), as well as The Hollies’ first venture into the U.S. top 40 with “Look Through Any Window”.

In a 1976 interview Gouldman said the idea for the song had come while he was riding home from work on a bus. The opening lines were written by his father, playwright Hyme Gouldman. Graham Gouldman continued with the rest of the song in his bedroom, apart from the middle-eight, which he finished while riding to work – a men’s outfitters – on the bus the next day.[6]

Thirty years later he elaborated on the song’s beginnings: “‘Bus Stop’, I had the title and I came home one day and he said ‘I’ve started something on that Bus Stop idea you had, and I’m going to play it for you. He’d written Bus stop, wet day, she’s there, I say please share my umbrella and it’s like when you get a really great part of a lyric or, I also had this nice riff as well, and when you have such a great start to a song it’s kind of like the rest is easy. It’s like finding your way onto a road and when you get onto the right route, you just follow it.

“My late father was a writer. He was great to have around. I would write something and always show him the lyric and he would fix it for me. You know, he’d say ‘There’s a better word than this’ – he was kind of like a walking thesaurus as well and quite often, sometimes, he came up with titles for songs as well. ‘No Milk Today’ is one of his titles, and also the 10cc song ‘Art for Art’s Sake’.”[7]