Carry On (as made famous by Crosby, Stills, Nash, & Young)

Déjà Vu is the second album by trio Crosby, Stills & Nash, and their first as a quartet with Neil Young. It was released in March 1970 by Atlantic Records, catalogue SD 7200. It topped the pop album chart for one week and generated three Top 40 singles: “Woodstock”, “Teach Your Children”, and “Our House”. It was re-released in 1977 as SD-19188 and the cover was changed from black to brown. In 2003, the album was ranked #148 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. Certified septuple platinum by RIAA, the album’s sales currently sit at over 8 million copies. It remains the highest-selling album of each member’s career to date.[citation needed]

Déjà Vu was greatly anticipated after the popularity of the first CSN album. Stephen Stills estimates that the album took around 800 hours of studio time to record; this figure may be exaggerated, even though the individual tracks display meticulous attention to detail.[5] The songs, except for “Woodstock”, were recorded as individual sessions by each member, with each contributing whatever was needed that could be agreed upon. Young appears on only half of the tracks, and drummer Dallas Taylor and bassist Greg Reeves are credited on the cover with their names in slightly smaller typeface while Grateful Dead guitarist Jerry Garcia plays pedal steel guitar on “Teach Your Children” and former Lovin’ Spoonful leader John Sebastian plays harmonica on the title track.

Four singles were released from the album with all but the last, “Carry On,” charting on the Billboard Hot 100. The song “Country Girl” by Young is a suite put together from three song fragments entitled “Whiskey Boot Hill,” “Down Down Down,” and “Country Girl (I Think You’re Pretty),” and is so identified in the credits.

The popularity of the album contributed to the success of the four albums released by each of the members in the wake of Déjà vu – Neil Young’s After the Gold Rush, Stephen Stills’ self-titled solo debut, David Crosby’s If I Could Only Remember My Name, and Graham Nash’s Songs for Beginners. In 2003, the album was placed at number 148 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.[6] The same year, the TV network VH1 named Déjà vu the 61st greatest album of all time. The album ranked at #14 for the Top 100 Albums of 1970 and #217 overall by Rate Your Music.

The album was issued on compact disc a second time September 6, 1994 after being remastered from the original tapes at Ocean View Digital by Joe Gastwirt. In 1997 guitarist Fareed Haque covered the entire album in jazz form for the Blue Note Cover Series.